Wednesday, February 18, 2009

Lay Off Miss Kat!


You should only know what a strong proponent of ASL Miss Kat's Mom is on the Pediatric Cochlear Implant Circle. She asks direct questions and always responds to mothers seeking assistance with regard to ASL. SHAME ON THE PERSON- AND I'M SURE IT WAS AN ANONYMOUS COMMENTER- WHO INSULTED HER!

*Thoroughly DISGUSTED*

Miss Kat's Mom has been through an extremely difficult period recently and has shared her experiences to enrich and assist other moms. Who needs the aggravation? Her blog "Wounded," a result of the emotional assault, produced this comment reaction:

Valhallian said...
That unfortunately does happen, it makes me think of two things.

The first being where I first went to NTID/RIT and I was made fun of because I was not able to sign at the time. But I overcame that and became a fluent signer and am now accepted in the deaf community.

Second, being more important, there is this hearing lady friend that I have been very close to since 7th grade. 13 years ago, she had a daughter and she could sense from the hospital staff that something was wrong. She got all nervous until the doctors told her that the problem with her baby was the fact that she was deaf and her response was "that's it? I can handle that". That was a result of our friendship so she was familiar with deafness and saw that it did not really hinder me from doing anything that anyone else could do, with the exception of relying on listening skills, which I did not have.

She then took the incentive to learn sign language and when I saw her about five years ago at our high school 20 year anniversary and she brought this adorable daughter that was about 8 years old at the time. They were signing to each other so beautifully and it was a great sight to see. I did not see her often as she lived in another state.

Well, I found out that she had relocated back to my state, but in a town about 70 miles away and about three weeks ago, she and I got together for lunch.

What was very astounding about this was that she had tremendously improved in her signing skills and was able to hold her own when communicating with a deaf co-worker that also joined us for lunch. She also told me that her daughter was outfitted with a CI a few years ago. Her daughter is now thirteen and I have not yet seen her but I will sometime soon.

But what she told me was that when she is with her hearing peers, she quite relies on her CI and is able to speak and listen to them.

Now this is the kicker that I LOVE!!!! When she is around her deaf peers, she actually turns off her CI and uses ASL in communicating with them. Now I was impressed with this!!!!!

But yet, there was a situation that happened a few minutes later that absolutely blew my mind away. This daughter actually called her on a cell phone and they were able to communicate rather easily. She was not using relay services, but her own cell phone as she was at the airport and she was letting her mom know that her plane had been delayed.

If she is 13 now, I would imagine that she was implanted when she was about ten. What was important was that this mother took the incentive to expose her daughter to both the spoken language and ASL and she worked so extensively with her daughter over the last three years to build up her listening skills using the CI.

I am planning on meeting her again within the next couple weeks but what I am looking forward to most of all, is actually meeting her cute adorable daughter!!!!!


These are constructive comments that serve a purpose. Hearing mothers raising deaf children have enough emotional baggage to deal with without adding ignorance to the equation.

If YOU are on a mission to promote ASL and "Save the Deaf Children of the World," segregating those with cis from those without- start by taking a good, long look in the mirror. YOU are not Miss Kat's Daughter. YOU are a product of YOUR parents and if they did something that pissed you off- YOU go sign to them. Explain and define DEAF to THEM...NOT to the hearing mom of a Deaf child who is raising her child with LOVE and COMPASSION.

Oh and by the way...

Deaf children can hear, speak...



And sign...

74 comments:

MM said...

It is I hope just the odd few deaf extremists, we all have to try and learn to ignore them mostly. Their adherence ot 'Deaf purity' is very misplaced, and damaging to defa cultuire too, deaf children are the deaf future. "Not really Deaf" There are still dodo's out there who ply this view ?

Karen Mayes said...

I know.

*shaking my head over some misguided people*

Cultural politics... children and hearing parents are victims of them, unfairly. But it is something that the parents will never forget, being challenged on their decision. I was challenged (a few times) on my decision to mainstream my children from the Deaf Bi Bi school, all because they liked talking and listening, which has little or no place in Bi Bi approach.

Well, there will always be some people who'd feel the "need" to save Deaf children from hearing parents, viewing hearing parents as AGBell supporters, etc., which is not true. I am still very close to my parents, even today they don't know sign language and my children and they communicate just fine. *shrug*

Anonymous said...

Relax, girl.

We are all different people. I will not deal with "misguided people." I will let them to make some choices. There will not be the "last resort" unless the education will provide how the children will get. 1. Parental Involvement 2. Read Now 3. Better Education 4. Speech Therapy if needed. Get involve some activities.

Let the "older" children be happy and lead them what they want.

White Ghost

Anonymous said...

True...true...true! The sad part is when hearing parents meet or see deaf people they have no clue as to who they are. Should they be the militant type then the parents would most likely be put off.
I just hope that parents will educate themselves through various channels and visit schools and ask to meet with successful deaf adults and/or professionals before they form an opinion of the deaf community.

Thank you Jodi for making this blog available to everyone. With a bit of moderation (I live by this motto of mine..."everything in moderation") your blog is one of few that gives everyone the opportunity to share information and messages to those who need it most.
Hopefully, it also sends messages to extremist that when you go too far left or too far right that it does not solve anything and problems will continue to exist. There's got to be a happy medium somewhere. A little bit flexibility here and there will go a long way.

It's still cold!!!

Cheers,
Sharon

Ambulance Mommy said...

I have to say, I've never been a victim of the judging from someone actually leaving nasty comments, but I'm always worried.

I'm worried someone is going to tell me that he isn't really hard of hearing, or really profoundly deaf in one ear, because he can hear with the other ear. I kind of live on the outside of other HOH/Deaf mom blogs, because I'm worried about not being in the same realm as them.

Your post, and Miss Kat's post were two of the first posts that actually made me feel comfortable enough to say "you know what? we count! we are part of a community too!"

There will always be people who are determined to judge others...and if I spend my time worrying about them, what is that teaching my son? That he needs to pick one way or another, and live with it? That's not what I want to teach him. I want to teach him to be open, and aware of other choices that people who have similar needs like his have made.

I'm leaving this same comment on Miss Kat's blog, because I really wanted you both to know how much I appreciated your words...we are ALL part of a community, and there should be no walls or borders about where we can or can't fall in.

Thanks!

Anonymous said...

You go girl! I fully concur!

Rah, Rah! It disgusts me more and more to see some people who are so insensitive towards to parents who truly want to use ASL and provide skills to listen and talk. That is the bilingual approach!

Unfortunately, these 'people' are few in numbers, and they are vocal. There are so many of us think otherwise.

Amy Cohen Efron

Valhallian said...

Sharon hit the nail right on the head with this quote!

"Hopefully, it also sends messages to extremist that when you go too far left or too far right that it does not solve anything and problems will continue to exist. There's got to be a happy medium somewhere. A little bit flexibility here and there will go a long way."

We have our deaf extremists that go too far on one side that belittle listening/speaking/lipreading and we have those deaf and hearing extremists on the complete opposite side of the spectrum that belittle sign language, as we have recently seen.

It is indeed those that go too far left or too far right that causes the problem. If everyone could be moderates, we'd all be in a better world.

Anonymous said...

Amen Amy!!! I've been a part of the deaf community all my life and I still get these occassional deafies who will rub me the wrong way or say I am not deaf enough and when that happens I just ignore them...there are that same kind of people in the hearing community as well (they're either uneducated or stubborn--or both).

Cheers,
Sharon

Anonymous said...

I went to the DVTV and found it really ewww!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_UYEs9ZfmQ4&eurl=

White Ghost

Candy said...

Atta girl, Jodi! Tell 'em like it is!!

Paotie said...
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Paotie said...
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Anonymous said...

Exactly, the Deaf community does not own nor lay claim to the phrase "deaf and hard of hearing community" which encompasses all those with hearing loss and their common struggles with communication issues.


mcconnell

Anonymous said...

Well, this is the virtual world here. There are a "few" people who have way too much time on their hands and spend it at the computer behind "anonymice". These few will find a target to play with and direct their anger/frustration at, reliving their past over and over.

What Jodi said about these forum commenters hits it on the nail. I personally know someone who has taken her anger issues with her parents above and beyond personal borders, ended up estranging her own children and former business partners and turning her life into a trainwreck. All because she has never dealt with her anger issues in a constructive way. And this is in real life. Most of us know someone like this in our own lives.

Those forum commenters should take a good long hard look at themselves and at the collateral damage their anger has produced. In real life and online as well.

Ann_C

Valhallian said...
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Christian's Mommy said...

I was a victim of the hate-blogging a while back. Even with thick skin, it still sticks with you...

Jodi Cutler Del Dottore said...

Christina- I remember when that happened and how it affected you...
Mishka- When such a thing happens and it affects me personally because I "know" the person, you can be sure I'll write an indignant blog for that as well...
Ambulance Mommy- your comment was greatly appreciated, thank you...
Karen- your experience is an important one to hear over and over again..
MM- I am sorry you have had such negative commenter experiences...although you definitely seem like one who can hold his own in a debate...
White Ghost- You seem to be getting more and more into the educational aspect of these blogs- rock on, girl!
Amy..nice of you to stop on by lately...
Sharon- nowhere near as cold as it is here- frozen toes-not even a cappuccino can warm 'em up!
Valhallian- I agree and disagree. The extremist voices are important for expanding the moderate view as long as they do not border on the offensive..
Paotie...be nice, sweetheart...
Mishka- I haven't seen this, yet:
Do we see any public lynching of hearing people and deaf/hoh people for criticizing Deaf people over their decisions not to pursue cochlear implants and oracy for their Deaf children and telling them they are not part of the world?
Ann...that was exactly my point- I recognize my own baggage and work through it to grow- doesn't always work- but I try.
Night night to all...Jodi

Misha said...
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Mike said...
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Shel said...

Elizabeth (Mishka), I guess some of the commenters have proved your point about double standards.

Let me make it clear to all concerned that I view ANY Deaf child born, regardless of whether they get CI or not, as Deaf. FULL STOP.

That said, I must respectfully disagree to the present "wisdom" that ASL is an option, to be taken or not as people will.

ASL is NOT an option. It is a NECESSITY. None of us have said that Deaf children had to have ONE LANGUAGE only. We have said: ALLOW Deaf children to have ASL, which is a genuine LANGUAGE, (and not a tool i.e. TC, cued speech, etc) AND of course they can learn English. There is nothing wrong with children learning both languages in their contexts. Miss Kat's parents are wise enough to recognize this, obviously, and that little girl WILL thank her parents when she grows up.

As for the cochlear implant, it is not for me. I wouldn't want to have one implanted into my own head let alone my own kids. For me, that is quite an invasive procedure, and I find that distasteful. But that's just ME speaking for ME. I'm quite content to be bilingual... ASL and English, even if I don't speak or hear it. I'm literate in both languages. For me it's a matter of values. ( I don’t need to hear, shocking as that may be to some people.)

I have seen a couple of extremists, and yes purists, on the other side who declare ASL to be harmful, and that to hear and speak is better. Culturally Deaf people have taken them to task for their ideology, which is based on belittling ASL and ASL culture in favour of assimilation into the Hearing world. In addition, I believe that at least one blogger who deems himself moderate has called these people on their belittling behaviour.

However, I have yet to see other Deaf people (those with the disability view) criticize them as much as they do the "odd few deaf extremists and their misplaced adherence to Deaf purity", IF at all.

Double standards indeed.

Dianrez said...

Most people here, the exception duly noted, are being supportive of Miss Kat's mom.

Most of us here in the Deaf community feel a need to nurture the parents of the next generation of deaf people and to protect them from unfair attacks. Even on that we disagree on methods. Poor parents! As if they don't already have to deal with enough!

Let's stay on track and just tell Miss Kat's mom, Jodi, and all other parents that we feel for them and not to listen to the obvious kooks.

Anonymous said...

In light of most commenters herein that are Gallaudet products, it is getting quite taxing to see the consistent and persistent misconcept amongst some of them in regard to the bilingual approach. They keep saying that the bilingual approach for the deaf is "ASL and spoken English."

Au contraïre, the bilingual approach in the education of the deaf in the United States and Canada is as follows:

---ASL -- expressiver and receptive
---ENGLISH -- reading and writing

Literacy in writing and reading comprehension has absolutelyu nothing to do with the ability to speak, lipread, and listen in English or in any other spoken language. An article ran in The New York Times last summer that more and more (hearing) Americans can read, but they cannot read with comprehension! US News and World Report in May 2007 shows as follows:

1.France
2.Germany
3.Japan
15.Great Britain
16.United States of America
LAST: Somila

Meaning what? It has proven that reading with comprehension has absolutely nothing to do with the ability to hear and speak (or oracy and AVT, for that matter, in English or in any spoken language.

To have a better understanding about the concept of the bilingual approach, specifically for deaf children, see 'Unlocking the Curriculum: Principles for Achieving Access in Deaf Education' by three scholars, Dr. Robert E. Johnson, Dr. Erting, and Dr. Liddell and 'Deaf Bilingual Education: An Imperative' by Dr. Robert E. Liddell.

In real life, most, I repeat, most hearing children and adults, indeed, do make fun of deaf children's deaf voice and make more fun if using sign language. There are quite a small percentage of deaf extremists who object to oralism, CI, and AVT.

Jean Boutcher

deb b said...

very well put.

Rachel @ Cochlear Implant Online said...

"ASL is NOT an option. It is a NECESSITY. None of us have said that Deaf children had to have ONE LANGUAGE only. "

Shel,

Even if you feel that ASL is a necessity, you can't dictate to parents how they should lead their and their children's life. It's ultimately their own choice. Professionals can't even dictate to parents that they have to provide their children with a cochlear implant.

Rachel @ Cochlear Implant Online said...

I clicked before I got to finish...

So, it's ultimately parents' choice to choose if they want to provide their children with ASL, or cochlear implants, or AVT, or AO, or Cued Speech or whatever it is.

I will value in hearing and spoken language, but I have no right to dictate to the parents that they are required to provide their children with a cochlear implant or not to use ASL. I will tell them about my personal experiences and why I personally value in hearing and spoken language.

Dictating people how they should lead their life will make people runaway. My parents' personal experience is one of the examples. When I was an infant, a few professionals including an ENT dictated my mom that she MUST teach me sign language. It left my mom with a bitter feeling that she was being a bad parent, and this is something that parents don't need to feel.

Jodi Cutler Del Dottore said...

Rachel...
This-It left my mom with a bitter feeling that she was being a bad parent, and this is something that parents don't need to feel.

...is the entire issue in one sentence.
We all want to be the best parent to our children that is possible. We want to succeed where our parents may have failed. That is why it is so important to have access to all resources possible to make our decisions informed ones.

Shel said...

Rachel,

I agree that professionals should not be dictating to parents. Yet, that is indeed happening in Canada, and I won't be surprised if this occurs in USA.

There are ethical AVT therapists, but there are also those who threaten to boot parents off their clientele list if they signed with their children. Some parents ACTUALLY got booted off for daring to try to give their children the best of both worlds.

This is why I have such high respect for Miss Kat's parents who tried to give their daughter both worlds.

I have heard NO mention of this in the blogging world here on DeafRead other than when Mishka Zena attempted to address this on her blog two years ago. That resulted in a firestorm.

Shel

Anonymous said...
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Paotie said...
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Paotie said...
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Paotie said...
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mishkazena said...
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Anonymous said...

Then guess who encouraged a witch hunt by calling certain people "deficit thinkers" in the name of advocacy and empowerment?

One thing tho, to focus too much on the past can prove counter-productive. Improved educational understanding, improved technology and a better support system make all the differences today than compared to 20, 30 or 50 years ago with AGBell. Your own worst enemy is to stay locked onto the past rather than staying with the present.

mcconnell

Anonymous said...

...and looking to the future as well.

mcconnell

Jodi Cutler Del Dottore said...

Dear Commenters and Readers,
What went on on my blog while I was away...working, was disgusting and unacceptable- not to mention irrelevant and counterproductive.
You have been eliminated.
Jodi

Misha said...

What did I do? I didn't say anything bad at all. Why did you remove my comment, Jodi?

Misha

Jodi Cutler Del Dottore said...

The potato head comment, I think...grrrr

Misha said...

I didn't say any bad to Potato Head unless you mean I call him "Potato Head"? If that's the case, he knows I always call him "Potato Head" in the past. He doesn't mind. If not, all I told him that I'm appalled how could he tell Amy "Amy F Cohen" that she belittles the people. Yet he keeps belittling most of them, I'm not amused with that kind of attitude.

Misha

mishkazena said...

Thanks, Jodi

Anonymous said...

Jodi,

So sorry that you had through like this.

Today is only February. Heart. It's my job to cheer you up, girl. Hearty Hugs.

White Ghost

Anonymous said...
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mishkazena said...

I've asked Jodi to remove my comment, feeling it's not the right time to comment on it. Consequently I've moved my comment to my blog, as not to distract the purpose of Jodi's post. I commend on Jodi's standing up for her dear friend.

I am sorry Miss Kat's mother was told that Miss Kat isn't a member of Deaf Community because her daughter has a cochlear implant. Not only is Miss Kat Deaf, she also uses ASL. She's also a representative of the new generation of Deaf Community. More and more kids are fitted with cochlear implants than before.

I think it's an encouraging sign that more and more parents are seeing that ASL is not the villain it is portrayed to. They see the importance of ASL a language being fully accessible to their Deaf children.

mishkazena said...

Pardon me, anon?

Guilt? On the contrary. I've posted my comment in my blog for everybody to discuss.

Jodi Cutler Del Dottore said...

Misha,
Your comment may have been deleted by mistake...I remember reading it and thinking it was okay, but I got so frustrated having to delete others that it's possible I got delete happy- so I apologize...Jodi

Misha said...

Jodi...

It's okay. It's no biggie. It's just a honest mistake. At least you're trying your best to redirect them to the topic which I don't blame you.

Considered it forgotten. It's time to keep supporting Miss Kat and her mom.

Still, I read your blogs all the time and really enjoy them.

*smiles*

Ciao, Misha

Jodi Cutler Del Dottore said...

Thank you, Sunshine- sorry about the misunderstanding...un bacio

Anonymous said...

Haha! You play as stupid as usual. There're two issues in your comment. You moved the first issue to your blog. Where's the second issue? In the wastebasket out of your guilt!

Miss Kat's Parents said...

Jodi,
Thank you for your suppostr and understanding. It is great to know that there are people who have walked a different path, but still see value in other's journey's as well.
I have always followed your blog and I believe that you are incredibly open-minded and resonable. In fact, I believe you quoted me in a very respectful post about following your child's lead awhile back, and I respect you so much.
Thank you!

Ok, I also want to clarify that the people who were so disrespectful, didn't say that it was the CI that made Miss Kat deaf instead of Deaf, but the fact that I am her mother. Because I am hearing, and I value spoken language. she isn't Deaf. Maybe someday, when she rejects me and the hearing world, then she can call herself Deaf, but I don't have the right to use that word.

mishkazena said...

What second issue? Can you refresh my memory?

On a second thought, why am I wasting my time talking to someone who isn't brave to use a real name while calling me stupid?

mishkazena said...

"Because I am hearing, and I value spoken language. she isn't Deaf. Maybe someday, when she rejects me and the hearing world, then she can call herself Deaf, but I don't have the right to use that word"

Miss Kat's parents, the majority of Deaf people have hearing parents. Some Deaf people accept hearing world. Some Deaf people can talk.

One thing is for sure about the Deaf Community is the variability of Deaf people. Some Deaf people associate with other Deaf people only. Some Deaf people socialize with both Deaf and Hearing people. Some Deaf people can talk while others don't. Some Deaf people do use hearing aids while others don't.

But if Miss Kat is Deaf and uses ASL, she is a member of the Deaf Community.

Shel said...

Whoa, Miss Kat's Mom! Your child isn't Deaf because her mother is hearing?!? That is a new one, and I thought I had seen everything.

Whoever told you that has a a couple screws loose.

Elizabeth (Mishka Zena) is correct. The majority of Deaf people come from hearing parents.

My own parents are Hearing.


Jodi,

I, too, must apologize for inadvertently hijacking your blog in response to Mishka Zena's comment. Out of respect for your topic, I will not continue my debate with Rachel on this blog, but on another blog or vlog...possibly on my own, IF she ever visits there. (Right now, I have a full schedule with all my boys' hockey schedules, my own life, etc though, so I'm not sure when I'll blog yet. )

Jean Boutcher, you gave a beautiful explanation on what bilingual and bicultural means. My compliments to a fellow bilingual, except I believe you are trilingual, aren't you?

Shel

Rachel @ Cochlear Implant Online said...

You know what puzzles me? If these Deaf people reject people who use cochlear implants even if they use ASL like Miss Kat, do they realize that they are causing the Deaf community to shrink or even causing the Deaf community to disappear? I understand that many people cherish the Deaf community, and in order for it to continue to exist, those extremists need to welcome people from all walks of life and talk about ASL positively by talking about their appreciation for the Deaf Culture and ASL, why they are proud to be part of it and having the ability to use ASL, how the Deaf Culture and ASL have enriched their life, and why they feel that they're living in a fulfilling life, and also talk about what they have accomplished as a deaf person.

Dianrez said...

Rachel, we're here to give support to Miss Kat's mom and others like her who are giving their child a comprehensive approach.

The occasional kook who tries to rain on a parent's parade because of inclusion of the CI isn't representative of the Deaf Community. Far from bringing it down, they are more likely to be left behind.

As Mishkazena said, Miss Kat is representative of the Deaf community of the future: a whole generation of CI children using ASL. Happy thought, but we will have to see if it will be that homogeneous. ;-)

Candy said...

I will have to agree with Rachel, she's right in that regard.

I know this post is to support Miss Kat, and I have left my comment over at Miss Kat's blog supporting her.

The big issue with all of this is lack of respect for the other parent's choice and all the labels one tends to throw at another.

The extremists, you know who you are, needs to be stopped in their tracks, they are the ones that make the deaf community (D or d) look bad. Who wants to be part of that community if the extremist from that community contintues to do what they do. What is interesting is that, we do not see ANY extremist from the deaf community coming out in full force when someone puts a parent down for implanting their child. tsk tsk.

We have seen so much of the ASL deaf community putting down the C.I./oral communty but rarely do we see C.I./oral putting down the ASL deaf community.

One can be sure that I have put down MY OWN community for their double standards and I will continue to do so. I have every right to because the ASL deaf community is MY birthright whether I like it or not and whether I want to be part of it or not and whether anyone likes it or not.

ASL is *NOT* a criteria to be part of the so called Deaf community.

Valhallian said...

Rachel hit the nail right smack on the head with her last comment.

The CI is here to stay and it is not going to go away. As a matter of fact, at the rate technology progresses, the CI is only going to get better. However, I also believe that there will be a time when the CI will head towards the phase of become obsolete, and that is when stem cell research is able to clone a cochlear for cochlear transplants.

It is the cochlear transplant that will eventually decrease the size of the deaf community because there is no way that it would be known that they are deaf, whereas you can see that with the CI users.

Bottom line, we as a deaf community, need to be able to accept all communication modes to be able to progress forward as a deaf community. Not doing so will only keep the deaf community where it is or set it back and there will be no forward progress.

Anonymous said...

Valhallian writes:

"The CI is here to stay and it is not going to go away."

I have no problem with people who want to be implanted. They have free will of choice.

BUT:

Cochlear implanters have no business to have American taxpayers pay out of their pockets for their cochlear implantation via Medicaid. They ought to buy an insurance that would cover the implantation surgery expenses or apply for financial assistance from some charity.

Deafness is not an illness. Deafness is merely an absence of one of the senses. To compensate for deafness, a person -- by nature -- increases a perception of two senses, namely, sight and feel -- the former of which many hearing people take for granted.

Jean Boutcher

Anonymous said...

Jean at 4:53 PM: You stated that:

"BUT: Cochlear Implanters have no business to have American Taxpayers pay out of pockets for their cochlear implantation via Medicaid. They ought to pay an insurance that would cover the implantation surgery expenses or apply for financial assistance from some charity."

American Taxpayers and Medicaid. I have no problem with that.

Okay, Jean, I'll give you an example.

Would you care for soldiers who lost their hearing due to the bombs? They sacrificed their lives for our country. After the September 11th, many soldiers have sacrificed their lives to save others.

You have a lot to think about, Jean. That's the case. I have no problem with that.

White Ghost

Rachel @ Cochlear Implant Online said...

Jean,

If the government are willing to provide deaf people with interpreters by using the tax payer's money so that they can communicate with people who have no knowledge of sign language, then they should help those people who can have the ability to hear and to speak provide cochlear implants so that they can have the same access as deaf people who don't have cochlear implants and use interpreters. I'm not saying that cochlear implants is a better option. I'm saying that people should have the option to choose to communicate by hearing and speaking and use cochlear implants or by using sign language and using interpreters.

Rachel @ Cochlear Implant Online said...

*by providing them with cochlear implants...

Just a little typo there.

Miss Kat's Parents said...

Rachel.

That is a mighty good point. Thank you.

MM said...

I'm wondering if these people who see fit to attack a parent and child in this manner, violate laws in the USA ? Surely it is child abuse and discrimination ? I think there is a blurring of 'rights' and it is being used to isolate and pigeon-hole people, via threats if they don't conform. It is about acceptances not conformity. Why make deaf children suffer for Deaf adult bigotry ? They should pick on people their own size... we know how to sort them out.

Li-Li's Mom said...

Rachel, my sentiments as well. I'm all for supporting access for all deaf by all communication means.

Valhallian said...

Rachel, I wish that were true, that taxpayers pay for interpreters in general, but that isn't the case.

While taxpayers would pay for interpreters in public schools or in appointments with government agencies, or in the government workplace but thats about it I would imagine.

One could argue that taxpayer pay for interpreters in police stations and courtrooms, but the problem is that they often deny interpreters.

Taxpayers do not pay for interpreters in emergency rooms, doctor's offices, lawyers, etc.

If taxpayers actually paid for all interpreters, we would not be seeing the denial of that particular communication access ya know?

Jodi Cutler Del Dottore said...

Rachel...
Rockin' response...
Have a good weekend to all...
Jodi

Naomi said...

At the risk of starting a string of methodology responses (which is not my intent) I just wanted to comment on the response about parents wanting to use sign language being booted of an AVT program. The fundamental premise of AVT is maximising audition for speech and hearing, so as a consequence the use of sign is not part of that program methodology. Parents can still choose which methodology they wish to use for their own children and if they wish to incorporate sign language then AVT is not the most suitable program. There are other programs that will support both sign and spoken languge and these are a far better option than AVT for the parents that have chosen this route for their children. Don't attack the program because it stays true to the principles of its purpose, but rather spend your energies ensuring that there are programs available to meet the needs and choices that parents are making for their children

Anonymous said...

Mishkazena writes: "Can you refresh my memory?" You played stupid as usual! You hurried removing your comment, but it was already copied with date & time. Next time, be honest with yourself in all of your cmments and blogs!

mishkazena said...

Since you refuse to refresh my memory, I wonder why.

I cannot answer your question as I have no idea what you are talking about. I've asked others who did see my comment and they don't know what you are talking about, either.

As far as I am aware, I am not throwing anything in the trashbasket nor am I guilty for my words. Please don't put words into my hands as you have no idea what I think or feel.

mishkazena said...

By the way, I see you continue to hide behind an anonymous name. ;)

Jodi Cutler Del Dottore said...

To the anon poster- I removed the comment, no one else.
Jodi

Miss Kat's Parents said...

Naomi,
AVT is the best way to teach spoken language to a deaf/hoh child. ASL is the easiest way for a deaf/hoh child to communicate. That would be the best of both worlds in my eyes. I have never asked a AV program or therapist to use ASL with my child or in a session. That would be unacceptable and against their philosophy, and I understand that. BUT what I do with my child, in our home, is none of their business.
TC programs (sign and speech combined) actually have the poorest outcomes of any methodology. That is why parenys like LiLi's mom and I do not want that for our children. We want pure ASL and pure spoken language, just at different times.

Rachel @ Cochlear Implant Online said...

"AVT is the best way to teach spoken language to a deaf/hoh child. ASL is the easiest way for a deaf/hoh child to communicate."

Miss Kat's Parent,

I disagree with this comment. No communication method is better than the other.

Let me ask you this question - how can a deaf or a hard of hearing child communicate via ASL with someone who does not know ASL? Remember, not everybody knows ASL, and thus, how can that be the easiest communication method?

Rachel @ Cochlear Implant Online said...

Miss Kat's Parent,

I also want to point out that I was born profoundly deaf and was raised with the AVT approach, and I personally feel that I can communicate via spoken language with an ease. I personally don't see how ASL can improve my communication skills as I don't know anybody except for maybe a few who knows ASL, and plus, all the people with whom I interact on daily basis, communicate by hearing and speaking.

Miss Kat's Parents said...

Ok, well, it is the fastest way to get a child to be able communicate. My daughter signed back to me 3 minutes after I showed her the sign for candy. She wasn't able to do that with spoken language, and that is why we chose to sign as well.
As for "best", how about I say, "it has shown to be very affective with cochlear implant rehab"?
I meant that ASL is very quick and easy for a child to learn, not that they won't be able to eventually with AVT.

Rachel @ Cochlear Implant Online said...

Miss Kat's Parent,

I personally think that it's about what is best for the child in the long run. I had a slight language delay when I was growing up. I entered kindergarten at the age of six with the language of a four year old. However, I managed to catch up over the years thanks to my parents' hard work, and also my therapists and teachers who also helped me tremendously. There were certainly times when it took me a while to learn how to say a certain word correctly, but I was very persistence and continued to learn it until I got it correctly. Even if I couldn't say certain words correctly for a long period of time, that didn't stop me from communicating effectively as it's not about perfect speech, and I still understood the meaning of the word that I was trying to pronounce. However, if I said a word incorrectly, my parents would continually remind me how to say it correctly. Nothing happens overnight, and it's all about having patience. It certainly wasn't easy, and it was a lot of work for me to be able to learn to hear and to speak, but because today, I interact with people by hearing and speaking everyday, I feel that the years of hard work has been paid off.

Also, children who receive cochlear implants as young as six months to one year old develop hearing and spoken language very quickly. I know quite a few children who are 2 to 5 years old who are able to pick words through hearing and speaking very quickly. These children can learn new words within seconds by simply watching TV and picking words from it or from overhearing other people's conversations too. So, depending on the age of implantation, AVT can be just as effective method as ASL in terms of providing the fastest access to communication.